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THE QUTUB COMPLEX IN DELHI

QUTUB COMPLEX III

The Qutb Minar complex, which drew 3.9 million visitors in 2006, was India’s most visited monument that year, ahead of Taj Mahal. The Qutub complex are ancient monuments and buildings in Delhi, India, named after the religious figure Sufi Sant Khwaja Qutbuddin Bakhtiar Kaki, was begun by Qutb-ud-din Aibak, who later became the first Sultan of Delhi of the Mamluk Dynasty (Gulam Dynasty) listed as UNESCO World Heritage Site   

Many rulers, including the Tughlaqs, Alauddin Khalji and the British added structures to the complex. Apart from the Qutb Minar and the Quwwat ul-Islam Mosque, other structures in the complex include the Alai Darwaza gate, the Alai Minar and the Iron pillar, and inside the complex lie the tombs of Iltutmish, Alauddin Khalji and Imam Zamin 

QUTUB MINAR

Qutab Minar a soaring 73m-high ancient tower of victory, built in 1193 by Qutab-ud-din Aibak. The tower has five distinct storeys, each marked by a projecting balcony and tapers from a 15m diameter at the base to just 2.5m at the top. The first three storeys are made of red sandstone; the fourth and fifth storeys are of marble and sandstone. At the foot of the tower is the Quwwat-ul-Islam Mosque, one of the oldest mosques in India. A 7m-high iron pillar stands in the Qutub Complex. It is said that if you can encircle it with your hands while standing with your back to it your wish will be fulfilled. The origins of Qutab Minar are shrouded in controversy. Some believe it was erected as a tower of victory to signify the beginning of the Muslim rule in India. Others say it served as a minaret to the muezzins to call the faithful to prayer

QUTUB MINAR FACE BOOK IMAGE

The Qutb Minar is inspired by the Minaret of Jam in Afghanistan, it is an important example of early Afghan architecture, which later evolved into Indo-Islamic Architecture. The Qutb Minar is 72.5metres (239 ft) high, has five distinct storeys, each marked by a projecting balcony carried on muqarnas corbel and tapers from a diameter 14.3metres at the base to 2.7metres at the top, which is 379 steps away. It is listed as a UNESCO World Heritage Site along with surrounding buildings and monuments. No one can, however, dispute that the tower is not only one of the finest monuments in India, but also in the world. Qutab-ud-din Aibak, the first Muslim ruler of Delhi, commenced the construction of the Qutab Minar, but could only finish the it, his successor, Iltutmush, added three more storeys, and in 1368, Firoz Shah Tughlak constructed the fifth and the last storey

QUWATUL ISLAM MOUSQUE

QUTUB COMPLEX V

The development of architectural styles from Aibak to Tughlak is quite evident in the Minar. The relief work and even the materials used for construction differ. The 238 feet Qutab Minar is 47 feet at the base and tapers to nine feet at the apex. The tower is ornamented by bands of inscriptions and by four projecting balconies supported by elaborately decorated brackets. Even though in ruins, the Quwwat Ui Islam (Light of Islam) Mosque in the Qutab complex is one of the most magnificent structures in the world. Qutab-ud-din Aibak started its construction in 1193 and the mosque was completed in 1197. Iltutmush in 1230 and Alla-ud-din Khilji in 1315 made additions to the building. The main mosque comprises of an inner and outer courtyard,decorated with shafts and surrounded by piller

QUTUB COMPLEX I

Image result for The Alai Darwaza Images

The Alai Darwaza is a main gateway from southern side of the Quwwat-ul-Islam Mosque. It was built by the second Khalji Sultan of Delhi, Ala-ud-din Khalji in 1311 AD, who also added a court to the pillared to the eastern side. The domed gateway is decorated with red sandstone and inlaid white marble decorations, inscriptions in Naskh script, latticed stone screens and showcases the remarkable craftsmanship of the Turkish artisans who worked on it. This is the first building in India to employ Islamic architecture principles in its construction and ornamentation

QUTUB COMPLEX VI

The unique iron pillar is one of the world’s foremost metallurgical curiosities. The pillar, 7.21-metre high and weighing more than six tonnes, was originally erected by Chandragupta II Vikramaditya (375–414 AD) in front of a Vishnu Temple complex at Udayagiri around 402 AD, and later shifted by Anangpal in the 10th century CE from Udaygiri to its present location. Anangpal built a Vishnu Temple here and wanted this pillar to be a part of that temple. The estimated weight of the decorative bell of the pillar is 646 kg while the main body weighs 5,865 kg, thus making the entire pillar weigh 6,511kg. The pillar bears an inscription in Sanskrit in Brahmi script dating 4th century AD, which indicates that the pillar was set up as a Vishnudhvaja, standard of god, on the hill known as Vishnupada in memory of a mighty king named Chandra, believed to Chandragupta II. A deep socket on the top of this ornate capital suggests that probably an image of Garuda was fixed into it, as common in such flagpoles

Image result for Tomb of Iltutmish

The Tomb of the Delhi Sultanate ruler, Iltutmish, the second Sultan (1211–1236), built 1235 CE, central chamber is a 9mt. sq. and has squinches, suggesting the existence of a dome, The main cenotaph, in white marble, is placed on a raised platform in the centre of the chamber. The facade is known for its ornate carving, both at the entrance and the interior walls. The interior west wall has a prayer niche (mihrab) decorated with marble, and a rich amalgamation of Indo-Islamic architecture, such as bell-and-chain, tassel, lotus, diamond emblems

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Alauddin Khalji started building the Alai Minar after he had doubled the size of Quwwat ul-Islam mosque built before 1311AD. He conceived this tower to be two times higher than Qutb Minar in proportion with the enlarged mosque. The construction was however abandoned, just after the completion of the 24.5-metre-high (80 ft) first-story core; soon after the death of Alauddin in 1316, and never taken up by his successors of Khalji dynasty. The first storey of the Alai Minar, a giant rubble masonry core, still stands today, which was evidently intended to be covered with dressed stone later on. Noted Sufi poet and saint of his times, Amir Khusro in his work, Tarikh-i-Alai, mentions Ala-ud-din’s intentions to extend the mosque and also constructing another minar

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